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Men behaving badly — 19 Comments

    • Welcome Crazy!  I had to look that one up.  "It's a good day to die"?  Do you know something I don't?  I'm getting a little nervous now…..

      • No reason getting nervous. "I have done most of the things I set out to do, so if I popped my clogs today I would consider I had done a reasonable job of this life.." Pretty calm attitude. Maybe Mr Horse thought something like that before final battle, dunno. Actually nothing to do with your article, just an association came in mind.

  1. Just ignore them… they HAVE to produce some sort of report now and again to justify their massive tax-payer-funded grants. Otherwise they'd have to go out and do some proper research that somebody would pay for. Or get a proper job. And THAT SIMPLY WON'T DO!

  2. One needs to keep in mind that even if it is true (and I have serious doubts on that score) that if you live a bland, boring life you will gain an extra couple of years, those extra years come at a time when you can't really do much with them anyway. They would probably be spent in a nursing home, not knowing who you or your kids are and having your arse wiped by some hatchet-faced harridan (when she can be bothered). Not exactly something to aspire to. As Kingsley Amis once quipped, "No pleasure is worth giving up for an extra couple of years in a nursing home in Weston-Super-Mare."

    • I have heard it said [and Doc backs me up on this] that one of the greatest recipes for longevity is just to be happy.  Someone had better tell these twats with their "research" as they are just doing their best to make is all miserable.

      • That must be why, at 66, I'm full of it – projects on the go, a beautiful young wife and everything to live for. And yes, I'm as happy and relaxed as I've ever been. 🙂

        I may not live forever (in fact I've no desire to), but I've packed into my life so far more than most people would hope to achieve in five lifetimes, and no regrets about any of it, even the bad bits. And I'm still in the process of doing stuff that many can only dream about. So if it all ends tomorrow, I won't feel cheated.

        "I live the life I love, and I love the life I live" (from a Mose Allison song which I first heard in 1967, and has stuck with me since).

  3. I like things in life like eatting badly staying up far to late and haveing bad think… Its what I live for 

    • That is what life is all about.  Sometime we are all going to shuffle over the threshold, and I would rather look back and say I was happy and enjoyed myself.  Otherwise it would all be a pathetic waste.

  4. As I am a bit of a titch and, therefore, have very little 'height', is this an advantage or a hindrance ???

    As I am 80 next year and as 'fit as a fiddle', how much longer will I last???   I consume:….

     

    No red meat

    no smoking

    very little salt

    almost no sugar

    one glass of wine with my lunch

    I take plenty of exercise (I have 1½ acre garden), I walk plenty and still cycle.

    I remain a bachelor – like my Dad

    I aim to make it to 100 so that Charlie boy has to send me a telegram (that is if his Mum has not died)

    • I'm not sure about the height bit as they don't say much.  Whether it's too much or too little or indeed having any height whatsoever, I don't know.  Though come to think of it, having any height at all must be fatal, as every person who has ever died has had a height, so maybe that's what killed them?

      And don't you know that there is no such thing as a safe level of alcohol?  The wine will have to go.

      • Too bloody right, GD. A glass of wine at lunchtime? Would that be a full glass? Blimey, an early death beckons. Don't you read the Daily Mail? Doomed, I say, doomed…

  5. As Kingsley Amis once quipped, "No pleasure is worth giving up for an extra couple of years in a nursing home in Weston-Super-Mare."  Bearing that well expressed quip in mind I can now in good conscience continue to enjoy a glass or two of fine wine with Sunday lunch, and on sunny Sunday afternoons I can, instead of sherry trifle with whipped cream,  indulge in bags of potato crisps washed down with a big bottle of fizzy red lemonade. They can keep Weston-Super-Mare: I'll retire to the Forty Foot at Sandycove.

  6. Enjoyed the post. And this bit piqued my interest:

    "if I popped my clogs today I would consider I had done a reasonable job of this life and that it would be interesting to see what the next one has in store."

    because it's as near as damn-it the phrase used by a dear friend who happens to be a Buddhist.

    Now those people are reputed to lead frugal, good lives (though in reality many Buddhists' smoke – or they do in Thailand, which is where he lives).

    Anyway I eventually get to the point and that's about this chap who lived for 74 years and was dug up 75 years after he'd been buried. Well worth a shuftie. My mind still boggles.

    http://www.welikeviral.com/mummified-buddhist-monk-found-alive-almost-90-years-death.html

    Me, well I sort of fancy coming back as a Kauri tree. Those guy's have got life in the slow lane down pat.

    http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/kauri-forest/page-1

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