A horse by any other name

This horesemeat lark is the gift which keeps on giving.

It started with a Tescos burger and has become a pandemic of panic across Europe.

In its own way it has become the perfect example of the sanitised vacuum-packed world we live in.

There is nothing wrong with horse meat.  It is as edible as cow, pig, sheep or any other animal.  There may be some who think it distasteful to eat some kinds of meat, and there are other weirdos who object on religious grounds, but meat is meat is meat.

The Nannies are screaming that there may be all sorts of chemicals in the horse meat that are “not designed for human consumption”.  So what?  Unless we are talking about Anthrax or some other little lovely, these chemicals are in the one par per trillion range and aren’t going to have the least effect.  We ate cow meat for long enough when it was pumped full of antibiotics?  Maybe that wasn’t so advisable but it didn’t kill us.

Of course this latest “panic” is going to give rise to a raft of rules, regulations and restrictions which are just going to sink society further into a morass of petty red-tape and bureaucracy.  

The simple solution to the whole business would have been to just re-label the packs and sell ‘em off as novelty items.  Instead, the Nannies have to dump God knows how many tons of perfectly good food [if you call call Tescos burgers “perfectly good food” in the first place?] which would have been welcome in a lot of poor households.

Of course the ultimate joke would be the discovery that cow DNA alters in the processing so that it can easily be mistaken for horse DNA!

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on StumbleUponDigg thisPin on PinterestShare on RedditShare on Tumblr

Comments

A horse by any other name — 18 Comments

  1. I can't WAAAIIIT to see my sister who couldn't shut the fuck up about the great deals on pre-packed mince beef she'd get  all the time in Tesco. I might even gallop up to visit her tomorrow just for the laugh – she fucking HATES being proven wrong

  2. I once tasted a grilled zebra steak and thought it delicious, so I have no culinary objections to people eating grilled or braised horsemeat. In fact I think FAS could support job creation by helping to set up Irish zebra farms though I'd guess that Bord na gCapall would lodge strong objections to such an imaginative venture. In the high Andes they cook guinea pigs and in some parts of the world they breed large white mice for the pot. Let us try to solve our unemployment problem practically by establishing novelty meat production. Boiled bacon and cabbage is a monotonous part of Irish cuisine. Let's get adventurous.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>