Playing safe

I read something yesterday that quite frankly shocked me.

Twenty nine per cent of parents won’t let their kids play in the snow in case they get hurt.  Snow is “too dangerous”  Little precious might slip on the ice or, God forbid, someone might actually throw a snowball at them.

What the fuck has happened to society?

What has turned ordinary people into nannying fussbuckets who are scared of their own shadows?

When I was a kid a good snowfall led to hours of fun throwing snowballs and making snowmen.  The only word of caution I might have got would be a hasty “wrap up well” as I shot out the door.  When I eventually got home, I would get a cautionary warning about running hot water over my blue and numb fingers – “you’ll get chilblains”.

Was ice less slippery sixty years ago?  Were snowballs softer?  Did a fall cause less bruising?  Was freezing temperature less freezing?

Is it the all pervading preoccupation with health that is producing such a “risk averse” society?  Is it the constant nagging about how we must look after ourselves and reject anything that may remotely harm us?  Is it the constant bombardment in advertising about “healthy foods”, “healthy vitamins” and anything that is supposed to promote a “healthy lifestyle”?

Or is it the meeja with its sensationalist headlines – the Met Office issuing Red Alerts and tabloids with stories of every little mishap that may be due to the weather?  What the fuck is a Red Alert anyway?  What in the name of blue fuck is it supposed to mean other that to hype up a bit of weather into some kind of sensationalist national emergency?

That twenty nine per cent are not doing their kids any favours.  Just the opposite.  They are denying their kids some good healthy [there’s that word again] exercise.  They are denying their kids a chance to build up their immune systems.  They are denying their kids hours of social interaction and, well, fun.  They are not protecting their kids; they are damaging them.  I would go so far as to say they are not fit to be parents.

I really despair for society.

With a tip of the cap to Wasp

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Comments

Playing safe — 19 Comments

  1. Jesus H Christ on a bike – what a load of shite.

    I remember when I was young and it snowed, we would go off to the nearby golf club (it had a great big long hill) and career down it on home made sleighs without the possibility of knowing how to stop!!

    A lot more dangerous than a few snowballs. God help the little darlings.

     

    But in the same paper today a survey of a different kind which I'm sure will gladden your heart:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/9815253/Number-of-children-admitted-to-hosptal-with-asthma-falls-since-smoking-ban.html

     

  2. I agree!….Growing up in Canada was the best because of the snow!  We were told not to sled down hills with trees so as not to run into one of them.  Those were the BEST HILLS to learn how to STEER! ..Haha!

     " they may slip on ice or be bruised by a tightly-packed snowball."  

    We would pack rocks into our snowballs for a little extra entertainment! (always got shit for that one though!)

    Our snowbanks on the sides of the road were easily 5 or 6 feet high and every kid I knew traveled on top of them, not on the sidewalks as we were told!  Kids today are missing out on so much fun.  I fear our children are becoming imitations.

     

     

     

     

    • The only way to learn is by experience.  I bet after smacking a face off a tree, you'd remember better how to steer?

      We would pack rocks into our snowballs for a little extra entertainment! (always got shit for that one though!) – Reminds me of the bastards who used to pack dogshit into snowballs!

       

      • Brings back fond memories GD.

        "Reminds me of the bastards who used to pack dogshit into snowballs!" 
        I did that once to a lad on the road by the name of Hackett.. as I threw the snow covered ball of dogshit, I called him Hackett the packet of shit.. got him on the nose too. Him and about 10 of his friends chased me through the neighbourhood and up through the nearby forest.  They didn't catch me obviously.. I'm still here to tell the tale!      I definitely didn't 'play safe'.  :)    Fun times.. best chase ever.
         

  3. And growing up in Michigan meant snow created a whole new world of play and imagination time.  Making snow forts was great fun, and greater fun was raiding the other kids' forts and have snow ball fights.   Now, kids bash each other, using computer games.    No wonder we have a fucked-up culture.     ::sigh::

    • There are so many things that are right about playing in the snow, and so many things that are wrong about just sitting shooting endless zombies or whatever.

  4.  

     

    Down here in the rainy South, we rarely got snow, so to entertain ourselves we were left with the old reliables ………. like kicking the shit out of each other, stealing any kind of fruit that grew in a well tended back garden and trying to catch a glimpse of the widow in No. 23 as she got ready for bed. That last one included climbing a down pipe to get up on her garage roof. She heard us one night and I ran down the garage and just jumped the 25 feet down into her back garden.

     

    But, we never had anything as lethal as snow ………….. !

    • The deadly snow balls were the ones made of slush balls left to freeze overnight.  Then the fresh snow was formed over the core, and "bam", it surely packed a wallop.  Kids today don't know what they are missing.

    • So there you are… lessons in self defense, horticulture, anatomy and the physics of gravity.  A good all round education.

  5. I heard on the radio the other day the Cops in The UK were going to take ASBO's against snowball thrower's.

    I thought this might be against the kind of yobs who bombard your car whilst you are trying to avoid skidding off the road, but no, its against the kids, for the soft fuckers who don't like being 'included' in a good old fashioned snowball battle.

    WTF next?

  6. Children learn from experience; but all this coddling pseudo-psychology and health faddery is depriving them of natural experience. A kid learns not to lean too close into a pond or canal when it falls in and has to whimper home drenched. When a bunch of kids light a wood fire at a rubbish dump and roast jacket potatoes, they learn to cook the damn things properly, or not overcook them, according to the taste and bite when removed from the fire. Kids learn not to potter around a sewage works after their nostrils have picked up the ugly stench. And they learn to make proper sleds when they sumersault on their pink faces  when attempting to whizz down a snowy slope on a rusty sheet of galvanise. When teenagers enjoy illicit cider parties on summer evenings and get nasty headaches after mixing the stuff with gin or vodka, they learn how to mix their drinks properly in future. I'm all for the learn-by-doing pedagogy. Fun is fun and childhood is childhood. Let kids blow raspberries at nannyists  -  and if an irate nannyist slaps them in the puss they learn something about manners.

    Happy Chinese New Year, which falls on 10th February. This is the Year of the Snake.

    • "This is the Year of the Snake" …… KFC Kenny will be in his element then.

      On the subject though; no snow here today but there's heavy frost aplenty. I remember as a kid when there was some snow, some mates and myself went to the waterworks on a hill outside Ennis and negotiated the barbed wire fence to savour the view of the town and the surrounding countryside. Aaaaaaahhhh……… memories.

      Kids today? – Fucking nancies.

  7. The other problem is parents are scared to take their kids to A&E for the accidents all kids have, I know my son is very wary and he does try to give the kids as much freedom as is feasible these days, My grandson cut his nose jumping off the sofa and they had to stay for over an hour after a few steri strips had been applied so they good be 'observed' when alone. Now they are talking about logging every visit a child makes. It makes good parents afraid and the bad ones won't take them at all. When I think of the things we used to do it is a wonder we all survived, but of course we didn't have social workers then.

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